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Furniture

City hall transfers land to DRC and discusses furniture for new police station | News

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The Logansport City Council held a special meeting Monday night following a finance committee meeting to discuss the transfer of land to the Logansport Redevelopment Commission.

The first resolution read at the board meeting involved land at the former Jefferson Elementary School, which was transferred to the city by Logansport Community School Corporation in April 2021. At that time, the city was in talks with a real estate developer interested in the project. Earth.

A resolution to transfer the former Jefferson Elementary School land to the Rehabilitation Commission passed unanimously.

The second settlement involved land at Riverside, the former location of the old Logansport Utility power plant. The council unanimously voted to transfer the land to the Redevelopment Commission.

The Finance committee also discussed the renovation of the new police station that will be located in the former Logansport Juvenile Correctional Facility at 729 High St. on Monday night.

Finance Committee Chairman Dave Morris said contractor Steinberger Construction has budgeted furniture and equipment for the new police department at about $219,000. Steinberger warned that the city could save money by purchasing the equipment themselves, however, so Logansport Police Department Chief Travis Yike and administrative assistant Kassy Hoover made a list of everything the department needs. His list came to around $170,000.

Yike said that just the furniture for the new station totaled about US$142,000.

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“It equips all our department offices,” he said. “It’s new desks, new chairs, new conference tables, new filing cabinets, that sort of thing. We’ve been assembling our equipment and our furniture for the last 20 years.”

Yike said he tried to buy locally whenever possible. In addition to larger furniture, he and Hoover devised other cleaning supplies, such as toilet brushes, plungers, and mop hangers, needed in any building.

“With the police department being spread out now, we have to add another printer scanner so that each floor has one and each division has its own because we have to fax or email all our reports to judges and prosecutors every time we make an arrest,” he said. “In our evidence room, we need to have certain things for that, like stainless steel tables.”

Yike said the highest total for each item they envisioned opening on the station’s first day of operation was about $168,155.92. He hopes to receive a donation for outdoor picnic tables that would reduce that cost by $4,000. Two local churches are also donating furniture and supplies for two chaplains’ rooms.

Morris added that Yike also saved money by applying for and receiving a grant of nearly $17,000 for body cameras and working with insurance to save another $10,000 on the policy and the department’s training program.

“Travis and Kassy, ​​you guys are doing a great job getting the new building ready,” Morris told Yike and Hoover.

The police department should be ready to move into the new precinct by July.