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7 Paint Trends for Summer 2022, According to Design Pros

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While some interior design trends last for years (yes, we’re talking about you, modern farmhouse style), paint trends change faster, because painting is one of the quickest and most affordable ways to redecorate a room. Of course you don’t have to change paint with the seasons, but if your home could use a refresh, why not go for one of these trendy colors? We asked design professionals to look into their crystal balls and predict the top paint trends of summer 2022. From baby blue to hand-painted wall murals, here are all the paint trends the experts see in our future.



Cool blues

Benjamin Moore

“I feel like cool blues are going to be really big this summer, like aquas and baby blues. They’re fun, bright, and summery,” says Jessica Davis, the interior designer behind Atelier Davis. Think beyond the walls, Davis suggests, and consider painting cabinets, furniture, and other decor details.

Interior designer Lisa Gilmore also predicts that the summer of 2022 will be all about off-the-beaten-path blues, as we get more creative than the classic combination of blue and white. “Using a blue pulling a purple base is refreshing, exciting and unexpected. For me, Benjamin Moore’s Watertown 818 does just that!”



Painted floors

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If you follow design blogs or magazines, you’ve probably seen some stylish homes with painted floors in recent months. Davis predicts this trend will continue. “I think painted floors will continue to be great, but I see mostly checkerboards and stripes really experiencing a renaissance,” she says. Remember: painter’s tape is your best friend when creating a patterned floor.



Warm and earthy tones

Annie Sloan

“Take fun seriously in 2022. Color is everywhere,” says Annie Sloan, the creator of Chalk Paint. “Summer ’22 is led by warm, earthy herbal tones. Rich yellows like my ochre-influenced Carnaby Yellow, comforting yet sexy herbal colors like Riad Terracotta and the clayey Italian plaster of Piranesi Pink. This ties in with the post-lockdown trend for more personalized, characterful living spaces, while at the same time reflecting our desire for travel, excitement and zest in life!”



Painted architectural interest

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Hal Baran

“The trend to experiment continues and we are moving further and further away from one-
color houses,” says Sloan. If you want to bring color into your space without painting all the walls, try this trick: “A great way to add color is to use a picture frame and add a new color above it suggests Sloan. “This Bridgerton-esque addition of architectural detail is witty and adds character, charm, and height to your home when done correctly. Remember: color above the picture frame attracts attention! Run the same hue across the ceiling for maximum impact on the look.” If you already have architectural details in your home (think wainscoting or plank and batten), consider painting them a contrasting color.



Soft watermelon tones

Jenn Feldman Designs

“We see that many of our clients still crave a sense of calm and comfort in their home,” says LA interior designer Jenn Feldman. This desire for comfort leads to more nature-inspired shades, such as pale ivory, green, and blush pink, Feldman explains. “I’m starting to call it the summer of watercolor watermelon!”



Matte, textured finishes

Jenn Feldman Designs

“We lean toward flatter satin and lime wash finishes, which feel clean, fresh, and bright throughout the house,” says Feldman. “Adding that extra layer of texture to the finish can create such a great feeling that envelops a space,” she adds. When selecting paints, consider some historical alternatives to traditional paints, such as lime paint or milk paint.



Murals are making a comeback

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“I feel like artists are finally getting their chance with wall murals,” says Gilmore. “For so long people heard the word ‘mural’ and thought of a dated waterfall scene painted on your grandmother’s basement wall, adjacent to the wood paneling. Now, however, people have become more free and expressive with colors, shapes, textures and the like.”

Paint doesn’t have to stay in the house either. “Painted pools too! Give me more painted pools,” says Gilmore.